Connect with us

News

[REVIEW] ‘Red Eye’ – A Horror Buff’s Wet Dream!

Published

on

“The Most Brutal Film Since The Original Last House On The Left”

“Red Eye Will Evoke The True Feeling Of Terror”

“Brutal and Unpredictable! Bringing the slasher back to its roots.”

From the sinister and twisted minds of Tristan Clay and Destinie Orndoff comes an unforgettable horror film, Red Eye. The film follows a group of filmmaker friends who set out into the eerie backwoods of Black Creek, West Virginia to find the truth behind a legend. However, on their journey, the group also learns that sometimes monsters are much closer than they seem. To what extent will group go to document this local legend? Will they cross the line? Or will their passion bleed through? Red Eye is a film that is brutal and unpredictable, bringing the slasher back to its roots and will bring closure to all of these questions.

I have been following Red Eye over the past couple of years during its conception, and I was thrilled to have the opportunity to view this film since I was unable to attend the world premiere back on May 27th at the Gateway Film Center. Often the independent horror world does not receive the recognition it deserves, instead, receiving the cold shoulder expecting a bad film, just because it is not a “Hollywood Blockbuster.” I assure you that Red Eye does not fall into this stereotypical category, real passion and sweat went into this production, and that is the true value serving as the artery of the success of this film.

Carefully woven and pieced together, Red Eye conveys professionalism in every aspect of filmmaking. Right from the start I was drawn to and highly impressed with the dialogue and conversations these young characters were having with each other, it was authentic, and something Millennials will relate too. The foundation for character development occurred immediately, and I was vested in each one of the characters. When the deaths started to occur I was genuinely hurting as if I had suffered a real loss, the experience was deep, and this cast and production team took me to places I had never been, or thought I could ever go. The cinematography was outstanding, and everything flowed seamlessly together, the scenery was breathtaking creating a facade for the carnage that would soon ensue.

It is quite apparent that Red Eye came to be from fans true to the genre. With quotes and references made throughout the film, it was a nod to some of the best horror movies around. Character Rykyr Jacobs portrayed by Destinie Orndoff did a sensational job with her character, and the monolog she delivers during the 1st act is very powerful and moving. Rykyr explains her feelings and journey of being dubbed an outcast, being misunderstood and having interests not consistent with the stereotypical norm, which many fans will absolutely relate to and adore. Beauties Jessica Cameron (All Through The House; Scream Queen Stream) and Heather Dorff (Truth or Dare; Scream Queen Stream) were the icing on the cake with their stellar performances. Although I would have liked to have seen Cameron on screen more, it was a treat having her around even for a short while. This was my first experience with Scream Queen Heather Dorff, and I was quite impressed, I could tell she took her talents somewhere deep, maybe places she had never gone before, and the payoff was grand. Actors Hayden Wilberger, Scott King, reinforced the realism brought forth to the screen with their performances and interactions.

All in all Red Eye is an exceptionally well put together film in all aspects. From the beautiful cinematography, the hardcore monolog, and the gut-wrenching kills; Red Eye is worth the watch and in the tradition of Rob Zombie; Clay and Orndoff will not disappoint.

 

Links

RED EYE – FACEBOOK         DERANGED MINDS ENTERTAINMENT         RED EYE – INSTAGRAM   

RED EYE (2017) TRAILER 

 

 

 

-About The Author-

Ryan T. Cusick is a writer for ihorror.com and very much enjoys conversation and writing about anything within the horror genre. Horror first sparked his interest after watching the original, The Amityville Horror when he was the tender age of three. Ryan lives in California with his wife and twelve-year-old daughter, who is also expressing interest in the horror genre. Ryan recently received his Master’s Degree in Psychology and has aspirations to write a novel. Ryan can be followed on Twitter @Nytmare112

 

 

 

Movie Reviews

[Fantastic Fest] ‘Piggy’ Filled With Incredible Heart and Wonderful Terror

Published

on

Piggy

Writer and director, Carlota Pereda fascinatingly creates a world in which we are given equal helpings of moments of big heart and a creeping terror. Piggy is one of those rare horror films that could have stood on its own without the horror and been an Oscar-worthy bit of effective drama. The turn from compelling drama to shifting genre is as refreshing as it is entertaining.

Piggy follows Sara (Laura Galán) a young girl who assists her family in their small-town butcher shop. Sara is often bullied due to her being an overweight teen. The small town and its cliques make for a soul-crushing daily life for Sara. She is constantly picked on, called names and even physically tormented by the popular bullies. When Sara ends up having to walk home following an assault by the bullies, Sara comes face to face with a serial killer who actually treats the young girl as an equal – not picking on her or poking fun. The duo begins their strange cat and mouse dance of constantly changing twisted mutual admiration.

The small quaint town featured in Piggy is very minimalistic – matching the incredibly stripped-down, heart-on-its-sleeve story. That atmosphere is one that makes for a brilliant spot to match Sara and her sensitive nature.

Galán is breathtaking in her role as Sara. It’s an incredibly demanding and revealing role that constantly has her being abused both physically and mentally. The constant emotional terrorism surrounding her combined with body shaming becomes a terrifying small-town presence that ends up being more terrifying and warped than the habits of the serial killer.

Much like Sara herself, the film forces you to side with the serial killer. Despite, his cold-blooded actions against the people of the town, he still has a big enough heart to see Sara as an equal and someone who he even fancies at times. In any other situation its heartbreaking to realize that he and Sara could have easily been in a relationship if it hadn’t been for that whole serial killing thing.

Piggy

Piggy handles bullying and body shaming by shifting the tables and working the story with as much humor and fun as it works with serious themes. Incredibly, the serial killer isn’t as disturbing as the torment that Sara receives. The juxtaposition between those two things is an incredibly compelling exploration for film.

The film allows you to side with the killer and entirely has you cheering for Sara. Galán gives a breathtaking performance that will have audiences siding with her and willing to follow her down whichever path she chooses to take. Piggy is an incredible work that has as much heart and nerves as it does horror.

Piggy arrives in Alamo Drafthouses on October 7 and in theaters and On Demand beginning October 14. The film also won best horror film at Fantastic Fest.

4 eyes out of 5

Continue Reading

News

‘Bones and All’ Trailer Introduces Savage World of Cannibals and Lovers

Published

on

Bones

Call Me By Your Name and Suspiria director, Luca Guadagnino is back with a true masterpiece that explores cannibals and lovers. Bones and All is a fascinating film that is currently has my vote for Best Film of the Year. It really is that good. It stars Timothée Chalamet and Taylor Russell in an incredibly brutal road trip film.

The official synopsis fo Bones and All goes like this:

BONES AND ALL is a story of first love between Maren, a young woman learning how to survive on the margins of society, and Lee, an intense and disenfranchised drifter; a liberating road odyssey of two young people coming into their own, searching for identity and chasing beauty in a perilous world that cannot abide who they are.

The film stars Taylor Russell, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg, André Holland, Chloë Sevigny, David Gordon Green, Jessica Harper, Jake Horowitz, and Mark Rylance.

Get ready to dine with cannibals and lovely monsters when Bones and All arrives in theaters beginning November 23.

Continue Reading

Movie Reviews

[Fantastic Fest] ‘Hellraiser’ Fascinates by Carving New Damnation and Games

Published

on

Hellraiser

In a world of reinvention and retooling, there are often a lot of letdowns when it comes to our favorite films and TV shows. More often than not we are disappointed by the retelling. It is great to announce that David Bruckner’s recent Hellraiser reimagining is incredible and makes use of Author, Clive Barker’s original parts to incredibly give us the familiar while also carving its entirely own fascinatingly dark path.

Hellraiser tells the story of Riley (Odessa A’Zion,) an addict trying to live her life and resist all temptation. When Riley and her boyfriend burglarize a shipping container, they come upon the puzzle box. The box immediately begins to draw attention to it begging them to push and pull its corners. Little do they know that the box’s offerings will change their lives forever.

Hellraiser

The backdrop of Hellraiser is a dreary one. It is entirely filled with a sheen of darkness and grime throughout. The entire city and places the characters visit all become participating characters in the film itself. An amazing work of production design around every corner.

Director, Bruckner is commanding with the darkness. He is careful to control Barker’s bleakness and is great at it. Between himself and screenwriters Ben Collins and Luke Piotrowski the trio actively and effectively manage to solve their own puzzle box of the macabre and the constantly invigorating.

The Cenobites are back with a fully new roaster of incredibly creative beings. Each of them has a patchwork of skin in which flesh itself is what they wear. There aren’t any more bits of leather clothing that brought the legendary, Doug Bradley to life, instead, their wardrobe is made organically. Another fascinating detail of their look is brought about by these carefully placed pins with pearl tips. A touch of The Hellpriest’s personal touch.

The Hellpriest just as revelatory as the film. Jamie Clayton pays homage to and simultaneously reinvents The Priest from the ground up. A head full of pearl-tipped pins along with the fascinating touches from The Leviathan that add pieces of the box to her as well as the same creative organic wardrobe utilized by the other Cenobites. Horror fans have nothing but a brilliant experience ahead of them. Clayton makes the role her own and brilliantly creates her own spine-tingling voice for the character. A terrifying rasp, that is delivered with authority making her lines stand out with imposing importance.

Hellraiser

Ben Lovett creates a brilliant score that moves and shifts around as much as the puzzle box itself. Throughout it is entirely its own with tiny shifts to single notes of the famous Christopher Young score. The entire thing is devilishly done and creates an entire audio Cenobite all on its own. By the film’s finale, Lovett and Young become one in a chill-inducing crescendo.

Hellraiser is a fascinatingly dark work that combines Barker’s worlds and sensibilities into a brilliant haunting cocktail. There are hints of Damnation Game, Weaveworld and of course The Hellbound Heart. The hands shifting this puzzle box were tender and caring with Barker’s material. That reverence produces one of the best Hellraiser’s to date. Bruckner’s film gets back to diving beneath the flesh of terror. Jamie Clayton entirely lives in and reinvents The Hellpriest in every turn. Hellraiser brilliantly cuts, carves and pulls nerves. Dark, provocative, and filled with Clive Barker’s brilliance – Hellraiser is finally back.

4 eyes out of 5

Continue Reading


500x500 Stranger Things Funko Affiliate Banner


500x500 Godzilla vs Kong 2 Affiliate Banner