Connect with us

Movie Reviews

Review: ‘Stay Out of the Attic’ Is a Clever Rotten House Movie But With a Disjointed Foundation

Published

on

There’s always a house. The one home in the neighborhood or at its edge that just looms over the rest. Be it bad history or appearance, it’s one to be avoided at all costs. Unless you’re paid to go in.  This is the situation Second Chance Movers find themselves in. A trio of ex-cons led by Schillinger (Ryan Francis) and his associates Carlos (Bryce Fernelius) and Imani (Morgan Alexandria) have been hired by the elderly Vern (Michael Flynn, The Outpost) to move him out that night. He’s even throwing in thousands of dollars in bonuses. But he has one specific rule… stay out of the attic. Needless to say, they do the opposite of that. Soon however, the trio find themselves drawn there and discover all manner of grisly clues to their employer’s true identity…

Stay Out of the Attic or by it’s other more vulgar title Stay Out of the F*****g Attic! has a real 70’s vibe to it for a number of reasons. Not the least of which being the Nazisploitation aspects of the story. Which isn’t really a spoiler, it’s made rather clear in the trailer and becomes a plot point soon enough. The summery promises booby traps, Nazi experiments, and monsters galore… but it sadly doesn’t quite live up to the hype. There is one girl who’s being experimented on who takes some focus and Vern does have a ghoulish experimental pet of sorts that he sends out on our three protagonists… but that’s pretty much it. And there’s a couple of messed up and Nazi aligned traps but they’re few, far between, and not so impressive.  The story is fairly typical, with some rather unsurprising twists and turns. It’s a bad house run by a Nazi. That’s basically it.

The real highlights are the performances. The three leads make for a unique dynamic as ex-cons from different backgrounds and pasts who you can genuinely believe to be fire forged friends in a deadly situation. It’s easy to empathize with each of their plights and the dialogue between them is some of the most memorable in the entire film. You do not want to see them die, a hard thing to pull off for a horror movie. And Michael Flynn does an excellent job as the fascist owner of the house with his own insidious past and goals. Every scene he’s in just oozes menace that he attempts to hide behind a razor thin veneer of affability.  But you can just tell that guy has some horrific intentions on his mind. The gore is well done, with a few scenes that made me cringe in my seat. Particularly the Nazi malpractice experiments that lead to a lot of eye gouging and bloodletting.

While Stay Out of the Attic isn’t breaking new ground, it’s still a pretty entertaining and brutal horror drama with some memorable characters and performances. If that fits your bill, you’ll fit right at home here even for just an overnight stay…

Stay Out of the Attic is now available to stream on Shudder

Image via IMDB

Movie Reviews

Best 10 Horror Movies of 2022 Per Rotten Tomatoes Scores

Published

on

Woman covered in blood screaming into the camer

Like it or not the critic aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes is the place where films come to live or slowly die. Professional critics are the voice of opinion and that can sometimes be a weapon so mighty it can kill the biggest of dreams unintentionally.

Still, there are user reviews that can nefariously sway the numbers too. There is nowhere to hide. And yet the fact remains, those who want to read what others think before they dole out their cash for a movie seek out Rotten Tomatoes for advice.

Here are the horror movies Rotten Tomatoes thinks are the best of the year so far.

The Innocents (97%)

Children are creepy. At least the kids in this film are. Perhaps even more than being a top-rated horror movie this year, The Innocents is just a top-rated movie period. With a very unique twist and message, these children are evil film gets more disturbing as it moves along. With excellent acting by the pint-sized cast, this moderately paced chiller has a lot to say about the power of innocence.

Synopsis: During the bright Nordic summer, a group of children reveals their dark and mysterious powers when the adults aren’t looking. In this original and gripping supernatural thriller, playtime takes a dangerous turn. Available on Prime VOD.

Hellbender (97%)

Mother and daughter try to figure out the power of their relationship and who will survive it in this which witch is which creepfest streaming on Shudder.

Synopsis: A teen and her mother live simply in a home in the woods, spending their time making metal music. A chance encounter with a fellow teen causes her to uncover a connection between her family and witchcraft, which causes a rift with her mother. Available on AMC+.

X (95%)

The film industry is a dangerous place. It’s also ageist. So it would seem making an adult movie with young stars would be a safe bet. But not in X. This loving homage is deep-rooted in 70s horror, especially the Tobe Hooper classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. Even though all the tropes are there, the industry standard isn’t. The acting is so great in this film you can identify with most of its characters which sadly means director Ty West thinks us banal. Still, their reactions are believable and their intentions innocent despite the subject matter of their film.

With a prequel on the way and perhaps another on the way, X is a fun ride that doesn’t go gentle into that good night.

Synopsis: A group of actors sets out to make an adult film in rural Texas under the noses of their reclusive hosts, but when the elderly couple catches their young guests in the act, the cast finds themselves in a desperate fight for their lives. Available to rent on VOD.

You Won’t Be Alone (93%)

Take about elevated horror. You Won’t Be Alone has such a lofty story it transcends into the stratosphere. This intelligent and sublime fairy tale is so hypnotizing you won’t notice the nearly two-hour run time.

Synopsis: Set in an isolated mountain village in 19th century Macedonia, You Won’t Be Alone follows a young girl who is kidnapped and then transformed into a witch by an ancient spirit. Curious about life as a human, the young witch accidentally kills a peasant in the nearby village and then takes her victim’s shape to live life in her skin. Her curiosity ignited, she continues to wield this horrific power in order to understand what it means to be human. Available on Peacock.

Prey (92%)

Officially the most watched movie premiere on Hulu, Prey is nothing like you have seen before. As a prequel to the 1987 action/horror movie Predator, it works because the premise is so original. Take one part Comanche warrior with only her hatchet and her dog to protect her then pit her against an advanced alien species who hunts living things for sport. Pack that all into a non-stop 99-minute movie and you have a mold-breaking sci-fi powerhouse.

Let’s not forget the introduction of Amber Midthunder who deserves to take a bow after her industry breakthrough performance. Come for the action, stay for the David and Goliath moral.

Synopsis: The origin story of the Predator in the world of the Comanche Nation 300 years ago. Naru, a skilled warrior, fights to protect her tribe against one of the first highly-evolved Predators to land on Earth. Available on Hulu.

Hatching (92%)

Ooey and gooey, Hatching is a viscous nightmare. Taking several cues from the creature features of the 80s, this Finnish import had everyone talking at Sundance. Filled with practical effects, this film isn’t for the squeamish. It’s also not for people who don’t understand maternal instincts. As weird as it is intriguing, Hatching is an honorable debut for director Hanna Bergholm.

Synopsis: A young gymnast, who tries desperately to please her demanding mother, discovers a strange egg. She hides it and keeps it warm, but when it hatches, what emerges shocks them all. Available on Hulu.

Mad God (92%)

Thirty years in the making Mad God is quickly rising to the top of critics’ top ten lists. Stop motion animation and technological wizardry, this stunning film gets high marks for detail. Although some might get lost in its storytelling, there is no shame in reading the Wiki plot if only to better enjoy the labor of this masterwork.

Synopsis: A corroded diving bell descends amidst a ruined city and the Assassin emerges from it to explore a labyrinth of bizarre landscapes inhabited by freakish denizens. Available on Shudder.

Bodies Bodies Bodies (90%)

At first, the title evokes a beach full of hardbodies on spring break. If only that were the case. This A24 submission kind of snuck up on everybody, but it has since become a critical success. Directed by renowned actress Halina Reijn, Bodies Bodies Bodies puts yet another spin on the genre with tongue firmly planted in cheek.

Synopsis: When a group of rich 20-somethings plan a hurricane party at a remote family mansion, a party game turns deadly in this fresh and funny look at backstabbing, fake friends, and one party gone very, very wrong. Only in theaters.

The Sadness (91%)

Vile and utterly repulsive, The Sadness is not a background movie to play at dinner. Although too campy to fit into the extreme horror genre, this film isn’t afraid to push boundaries or exploit your triggers. There is enough depravity that it should come with an emergency alert, and a free BetterHelp account.

Still this over-the-top gross-out is going to flood some fans with dopamine, and to others, regret.

Synopsis: A young couple trying to reunite amid a city ravaged by a plague that turns its victims into deranged, bloodthirsty sadists. Available on Shudder.

We Are All Going to The World’s Fair (90%)

Creepypasta for the soul. This coming-of-age fantasy is more daydream than dreadful. This was another buzzworthy entry at Sundance. And if you can’t tell what’s going on from the trailer join the rest of us. With eerie visuals and an ineffable storyline, We Are Going to The World’s Fair makes for a memorable experience.

Synopsis: Alone in her attic bedroom, teenager Casey becomes immersed in an online role-playing horror game, wherein she begins to document the changes that may or may not be happening to her. Available on VOD.

There you have it, the horror movies Rotten Tomatoes think are the best of 2022 so far. What do you think? Are they right or wrong? And as always, let us know your opinion, and if there is one that should be higher on their list. Comment about this article on FB here or on Twitter here.

Continue Reading

Movie Reviews

Fantasia 2022 Review: ‘Deadstream’ Livestreams a Hectic Haunting

Published

on

Deadstream

Written and directed by Vanessa and Joseph Winter, Deadstream is a real-time riot. With goopy practical effects, a bare-bones presentation, and a very intentionally acted lead (played by Joseph Winter), the film concocts a faux-livestream that turns from uneventful to unbelievable over the course of one night.

Leading the livestream is Shawn Ruddy (Winter), a recently disgraced social media star who’s gained his fame by performing a series of ridiculous challenges (including in-poor-taste tests such as “running from the cops” and “smuggled across the border”). With his grand return to the internet (after an apology video, naturally), Shawn has decided to take a spooky turn by spending the night in a supposedly haunted house. Of course, when a controversial personality is set loose in a house with a dark past, he’s bound to upset the spiritual balance. 

We’ve seen a few social influencer horror films pop up over the last few years, but it’s a subgenre that’s kind of slid under the radar. With Sissy and Deadstream – both included in Fantasia Fest’s 2022 season – it’s got a bit of a resurgence, but the two films tackle this topic in very different ways. 

Deadstream is a goofy, entertaining romp that throws Shawn around, forcing him to confront his demons (both personal and supernatural). Promising “the most cinematic experience in livestream history”, Shawn delivers just that. It feels kind of like Grave Encounters meets Evil Dead II, with plenty of slapstick comedy and some very active ghosts. 

Winter’s performance is so very over-the-top that it’s actually perfect. It would almost be annoying, but it’s such a precise lampoon of online personalities that it becomes quite impressive. Everything done and said is a deliberate performance. There’s a set “character” that these personalities play, always focused on engagement for the sake of clicks, follows, and sponsors. 

Shawn is a man who is always aware that he’s on camera. His regular interactions with his viewers serves a dual purpose as well; not only is he staying in his very specific character, but it’s also giving the audience a bit more to focus on than just one man with a camera (or set of cameras). 

Everything in the film is orchestrated in a way to keep the plot moving and the audience tuned in. The illusion works; it’s believable (or at least entertaining) content. Winter’s comedic timing is excellent and his line delivery sells the online fantasy.

The proudly 100% practical creature effects and straightforward camerawork keep things simple and manageable for a low budget. The film is clever, well constructed, and puts a fun new twist on both the haunted house and found footage subgenres. Deadstream frolics in the puddle of its own absurdity, and has such a blast doing so, you can’t help but join in the fun.


Deadstream is part of Fantasia International Film Festival‘s 2022 season. For more on Fantasia 2022, click here to read an interview with the writer/director of Skinamarink, or for more influencer horror, check out our review of Sissy.

Continue Reading

Movie Reviews

Fantasia 2022 Review: ‘Sissy’ and the Obsession with Online Validation

Published

on

Sissy

“I am loved, I am special, I am enough, I am doing my best. We all are”. This is the mantra of Cecilia (known as @SincerelyCecilia), a wellness influencer who preaches acceptance and self care. Trouble is, Cecilia (Aisha Dee), has some skeletons in her closet.

In Sissy (written and directed by Hannah Barlow and Kane Senes), Cecilia runs into Emma (played by Barlow), her childhood best friend. They haven’t seen each other in over a decade, but this fateful encounter brings them back together, just in time for Emma’s bachelorette weekend. Cecilia is invited along for a chance to reconnect, however, the weekend away happens to be held at the vacation home of her childhood bully, Alex (now Emma’s best friend). Cecilia tries to make amends, but tensions rise and sanity crumbles. 

Sissy

Hailing from Australia, Sissy is about obsession and the secrets we all hide. For every post that shares a seemingly perfect life, there’s an unseen personal history behind the smiles and hashtags. We only present the positives. 

The film smartly shows the physical effects of online praise; the boost of dopamine that tickles your brain. But as the glossy sheen fades and reality creeps back in, things aren’t so shiny. Sissy is a clever and darkly charming demonstration of this obsession with validation. The lengths we’d go to maintain that social ruse. 

Online, sharing any kind of sad reality can get you shunned like a leper. It’s considered either a cry for attention or a disturbing affront. And in a time where nothing is hidden, secrets can ruin you. 

Dee is delightful as Cecilia. As balanced and zen as she seems in her opening video, we see her insecure, messy reality. It’s a good reminder that all those online influencers you see are really just people, presenting their best side with very deliberate design. It’s a fabrication. As she begins to lose her chill, all the cracks from her childhood start to show.  

Each role is perfectly cast, creating a group of characters who are believably close (and catty). Barlow and Senes capture the extreme social anxiety of Cecilia’s situation quite perfectly; anyone who’s had an anxiety attack before will find that pressure uncomfortably real. 

Things escalate quickly when you’re pushed past your anxiety’s breaking point, and Cecilia’s reactions are actually pretty unsurprising. This relatability is well orchestrated by Barlow and Senes, tightening the strings until they snap. 

Sissy

The film is well polished, well paced, and excellent at crafting a mix of emotions towards our dear sincere Ceclia. Her validation elation and pure bullied dread are beautifully communicated. The score adds to this, too, with a plinking harpsichord to highlight a twisted mental state.

Sissy works well and does exactly what it means to. It’s an entertaining and well crafted horror film, but it also shines a focus on the unreality of online influencers, and what exactly all that attention does to one’s mental health. 

Influencer culture is a bizarre thing. We only see what’s curated, and put our trust in people we don’t know. There’s a conversation within the film that explores this idea; how much should we hold influencers responsible? What are their credentials, really? On a grander scale, what does that pressure do to a person? 

While Sissy does pose some challenges towards influencer culture, it also understands the impulse to want that kind of attention. It acts a bit as a cautionary tale for online obsession, but also serves as a great horror film with some gnarly effects.

Sissy is for anyone who craves validation. It’s for anyone who doesn’t quite feel like they fit in. It’s for anyone who feels like they’re not enough. But really, it’s for everyone.

4 eyes out of 5

Sissy is part of the Fantasia International Film Festival’s 2022 lineup. You can check out the trailer and poster below.

For more from Fantasia 2022, check out our review of Rebekah McKendry’s Glorious, or our interview with the writer/director of the chaotically psychedelic All Jacked Up and Full of Worms

Continue Reading


500x500 Stranger Things Funko Affiliate Banner


500x500 Godzilla vs Kong 2 Affiliate Banner