Horror Movie News and Reviews
Steven Gomez's "Kill Command" is worth adding to your watchlist on Netflix

Movie Review: ‘Kill Command’

The first thing you notice about “Kill Command” is that it’s got a high-gloss above average budget. Which is surprising because I hadn’t heard of this film until it appeared on my Netflix list as “recently added.”

Usually a sci-ci or horror film that appears in that section can be hit-or-miss, and thankfully Steven Gomez’s robots run amok film is a true hit.

Kill Command is a tense and entertaining sci-fi film.

At first it looks like a futuristic dystopian society genre entry but quickly evolves into a man versus machine standoff with large mechanical robots which move like metallic centaurs. But these beasts have built-in weapons.

Kathrine Mills (Vanessa Kirby) is a cyborg who works for the Harbinger Corporation and she does her job well. She’s connected to everything in the mainframe and notices that some of the robots contained therein are malfunctioning.

She tasked with joining a training force headed to Harbinger 1, a tactical facility, to partake in war games, but also to see what is making the army of mechanical soldiers fail to work properly.

However, upon arrival they notice that communications have been severed from headquarters and they are greeted with hovering drones which seem to be gathering recognizance and sending that data to another source.

That source is a S.A.R. (Study Analyze Reprogram) unit which stands more than twelve feet tall, complete with a glowing blue optical faceplate and armed with a blow torch and vice-grip appendage.

The S.A.R also has quite a number of minions which are basically walking 50-caliber machine guns with crab-like legs.

Trapped and confused about the sudden rogue nature of the bots, the team decides to take matters into their own hands and eliminate the metallic menaces all under the watchful eye of Mills who has been locked-out of command functions due to an “error.”

“Kill Command” is a very entertaining sci-ci action picture. The plot has all the similar workings of other hub survival movies, but the style and detail director Gomez puts into this film could rival even the most mainstream blockbuster.

There are a few silent hiccups in the CGI work, but nothing blaring and the mother S.A.R is a movie villain reminiscent of the queen in Aliens.

Special effects team Luke Corbyn and Steve Paton went more practical than pixel and the result is astounding.

The last quarter of the film is tense and throttled with a few surprises. It sets up nicely for a sequel and honestly if it is anything like it’s predecessor, I’d gladly forgo the “recently added” section of my Netflix queue and join the one at my Cineplex instead.