Horror Movie News and Reviews

Jason Hawes Clears the Air About the Future of “Ghost Hunters”

Let’s Play – Short Horror Film of The Month

Jason Hawes recently took to BeyondRealityNews to answer the two questions he’s been asked numerous times since Ghost Hunters stopped airing on Syfy.

  1. What happened?  AND
  2. Is it coming back?

Hawes spent some time explaining the show’s current status, but he also went back in time to tell the story of how the show came to be.  It seems they’d only ever intended to do a season or two, just to show people what they did and how they did it, and they only agreed to doing that after meeting with Craig Paligian, CEO of Pilgrim Productions.

Craig told them he simply wanted to film what they did and air it on television. No interference.  No manipulation.  Just an honest portrayal of paranormal investigating like we’d rarely seen on television at the time.

“That sold it to us,” Hawes explained.  “We would be allowed to ‘Keep it real and stay ourselves!'”

They honestly expected no more than one season when people saw that regardless of how rewarding paranormal investigation was, it could still be very tedious.  To their utter shock, they soon had a huge following with thousands of people showing up for their live appearances and Syfy continued to sweeten the deal to keep the guys going.

Unfortunately, as the years went by, they became more and more exhausted.  Investigation takes a lot of time and energy and they were missing out on watching their kids grow up.  By the eighth season, Grant no longer wanted to be a part of the show.  He needed a break and no one could blame him.  Still, it was a serious blow to the morale of the team.

By season 12, everything was falling apart.  The show’s following was at its highest but Syfy seemed to be completely mishandling its asset.  They were splitting up seasons, airing only a few episodes at a time, and dangling the possibility of more in the faces of the fans.

“The fans found it hard to get any answers on when the show was airing, why the seasons were so short, and when the seasons would start,” Hawes said.  “They would send emails to Syfy asking for answers and never get a response.”

It wasn’t what the T.A.P.S. team wanted for a show with their name on it, and after 12 years, they parted ways with the network, BUT, that doesn’t mean the show is over, Hawes pointed out.

“There have been offers, but we want it to be done right.  We want to keep it real.  To be honest, we want to make it fresh again.”

And so, their search for a new home for the show continues with the promise of information as soon as they can share it.